Todays guest post is by David F Car. David writes that Rafter textbook rental broker finds niche partnering with public colleges to lower the cost of higher education.

If expensive textbooks perform a part in the rising price of further education, 2 extra villains are typically professors, who allot books without thinking about the price tag ; and varsity bookstores, which stand in the way of change. The way to turn these villains into heroes?  Rafter  Manager  Mehdi Maghsoodnia thinks he’s got the answer.  Rafter works alongside varsities and school bookstores on textbook rental programs and provides a sequence of Web programmes, including one to help faculty adopt the best textbooks while taking factors like price and accessibility into account.  Criticising  professors for alloting costly textbooks is biased, especially with a lack of tools to help them do better, Maghsoodnia related.  “It’s like medication, where the doctor’s inducement is to cure you.

The professor’s motivation is also to complete the job — to teach you.  It’s hard to ask him to also be a pro in the price of distribution and friction in the distribution channel.” Campus bookstores are often cited as an obstruction to breakthroughs like the arrival of free textbooks and other open tutorial resources.  But they have also got a chance to join the revolution by providing, as an example, print-on-demand variations of digitally distributed books.

Rafter is starting to put more focus on handling digital resources, and Sanders asserted he is inquiring into the print-on-demand option. Rafter evolved out of BookRenter, which sells textbook rental services directly to students. That business continues, winning the 2012 About.com College Life Readers’ Choice Awards as the best textbook rental website. The company name was changed to Rafter last year, reflecting a shift to emphasize working through the campus stores.

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